Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th World Congress on Biomarkers & Clinical Research Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Day 1 :

Biomarkers 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Frédéric Baribaud photo
Biography:

Frédéric Baribaud holds a PhD from the University of Lausanne and has conducted his Post-doctoral studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He has worked at Incyte Corporation in a discovery role on target validation and as a Compound Team Co-Lead for small molecular inhibitors. For the past ten years, he has been working at Janssen R&D in Imunology Biomarkers on various inflammatory diseases. In his current role as Scientific Director he is focusing on obtaining disease rational for targets and patient segmentation for inflammatory bowel diseases.

Abstract:

Objective markers of disease severity in inflammatory bowel disease that support clinical decision-making are still needed. We hypothesized that novel objective markers of tissue inflammation are best identified at the site of disease with a tissue-level assessment of disease activity. Biopsy samples were obtained from participants in the UNITI trials of ustekinumab in moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease. Pairs of adjacent biopsies were taken from the rectum, splenic flexure and ileum. One biopsy from each pair was assessed by global histology disease activity score (GHAS) while the other was submitted for microarray analysis. Partial least squares regression and random forest were used to identify biomarkers associated with histological severity and robustness of the resulting models was assessed using cross-validation. A single multivariate model comprising 16 genes was identified that predicted histological activities in rectum or splenic flexure biopsies. This model was characterized by R2=0.78 for the training set, and R2=0.59, 0.54, and 0.32 on external validation sets. A separate 14-gene model capturing histological activity in ileal biopsies was characterized by R2=0.5 for the training set and R2=0.45 in the external validation set. In general, both models contained genes related to tissue degradation, barrier function, and immune regulation, including CXCL11 (I-TAC). Both models retained performance in external validation datasets from UNITI-2 but exhibited lower performance. Our analysis supports the ability of biopsy transcriptomics combined with machine learning approaches, to capture disease-relevant variability in Crohn’s disease and, more importantly, supports the use of similar approaches to identify additional surrogate markers. 

Biomarkers 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker David Dongliang Ge photo
Biography:

David Dongliang Ge is the CEO and President of Apostle Inc., a Silicon-Valley-based Biotechnology Company developing a novel AI-enabled Nano Diagnostics (AID) Technology for early cancer detection. Previously, he was the President of BioSciKin Co. and Simcere Diagnostics Co., two global biotechnology companies headquartered in Nanjing, China. Between 2011 and 2016, he was the Director of Bioinformatics at Gilead Sciences, where he founded and provided Leadership to the Bioinformatics group.

Abstract:

The biotechnology industry has quickly entered an era when fast evolving genome technologies, historical precision medicine initiatives, and disruptive bioinformatics and artificial intelligence techniques synergistically start to provide pivotal and strategic support for new drug and diagnostics development. Unprecedented amount of data is being generated to help discover and develop new generations of medications. Using real-world examples, this presentation will cover several of the most important bioinformatics considerations in this strategy. How do we efficiently manage the massive amount of data at different levels of precision to ensure a seamless data flow? How do we annotate and present these data to make it more comprehensible and deliverable? How do we design and execute the new clinical trials more efficiently and improve the success rate? Where are we and where are we going in this new precision medicine era?

Keynote Forum

Kamala K Maddali

Cancer Genetics Inc, USA

Keynote: Integrated biomarker strategies in immuno-oncology

Time : 10:30-11:00

Biomarkers 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kamala K Maddali photo
Biography:

Kamala K Maddali is currently the Vice President of Biopharma Collaborations, Market Development and Companion Diagnostics at Cancer Genetics Inc, Rutherford, NJ. Cancer Genetics, Inc., (CGI) is a leader in the field of Personalized Medicine, offering diagnostic products and services that enable precision medicine in the field of Oncology. She holds a DVM PhD, in Pharmacology from University of Missouri-Columbia and a DVM Veterinary Medicine from Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University in India. She brings over 10 years of extensive experience of global P&L scientific and commercial management of clinical biomarker and companion diagnostics (CDx) services covering personalized medicine strategy. She brings a lot of strategic values from her previous roles at Quest Diagnostics, Quintiles and Merck Schering Plough in the arena of biomarkers and companion diagnostics. 

Abstract:

Immunotherapy enables the immune system to recognize tumors; insights into immunotherapy biomarker testing, especially PD-L1 IHC and; choosing the best patients for immunotherapy with the use of integrated biomarker panels. Combination regimens of immuno-oncology agents and targeted drugs may represent the next generation of cancer treatments and could result in improved outcomes and prolonged patient survival. This talk will focus on immunooncology advancements and a review of latest drug targets. In addition to the underlying science, we will focus on the practical aspects of targeting the PD1:PD-L1 interaction. We will discuss our perspectives of supporting PD-L1 as a pharmacodynamic end point and companion diagnostic. Additionally, we will focus on case studies, where we monitored PD-L1 expression and the variable sensitivity, specificity and dynamic range of three anti-PD-L1 antibodies in a cohort of 52 primary DLBCL patients. CGI believes that this work is essential in developing durable and reliable immune biomarkers and companion diagnostics for selecting lymphoma patients most likely to benefit from immune-checkpoint therapy.

Biomarkers 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yoshiaki Omura photo
Biography:

Yoshiaki Omura received Oncological Residency Training at Cancer Institute of Columbia University and Doctor of Science Degree through research on Pharmaco-Electro-Physiology of Single Cardiac Cells in-vivo and in-vitro from Columbia Univ. He researched EMF resonance phenomenon between two identical molecules for non-invasive detection of molecules, at Graduate Experimental Physics Dept., Columbia Uni., for which he received US patent. He is also the Creator of Bi-Digital O-Ring Test. He published over 270 original research articles, many chapters, and nine books. He is currently working as Adjunct Prof. of Family and Community Medicine, New York Medical College; President and Prof. of Int’l College of Acupuncture and Electro-Therapeutics, NY; Editor-in-Chief, Acupuncture and Electro-Therapeutics Research, Int’l Journal of Integrative Medicine, (indexed by 17 major int’l Indexing Periodicals). Formerly, he was also Adjunct Prof. or Visiting Prof. in Universities in USA, France, Italy, Ukraine, Japan, Korea and China.

Abstract:

Using highly sensitive electro-magnetic field resonance phenomenon between two identical molecules with identical amount, which was discovered at Graduate Experimental Physics Department of Columbia University (for which US Patent was given under the name of Bi-Digital O-Ring Test for the imaging and diagnosis of internal organs), the author was able to non-invasively detect any molecules, including neurotransmitters, specific cancers of specific internal organs, virus, bacteria, fungus and toxic substances. Using this method, he developed the following three early diagnostic methods: 1) Accurate organ representation areas of face, including eyebrows, pupils, nose, upper and lower lips, upper and lower side of the tongue, hands, and feet which were accurately mapped using above-resonance phenomenon. The author often found in the presence of malignancy, deep crease or round projection appeared in the organ representation areas with or without discoloration. In addition, eyebrows where every organ is represented, in the presence of malignancy, color of the eyebrow changes to a white color and eventually hair disappears. In addition to these visible changes, in the presence of cancer, there will be invisible changes also, which can be detected rapidly using Bi-Digital O-Ring Test non-invasively without even touching a patient. These invisible changes were often found at different organ representation areas of nose, lips, tongue, and hands. 2) One page “Mouth, Hand, and Foot Writing Form”. Completion of the form takes about 5-10 minutes. From this one-page form, almost any malignancy can be detected. Any malignancy can be screened in one minute and the exact malignancy can be identified within 5-10 minutes non-invasively without knowing any medical history of the patient. 3) Detection of any cancer or malignancy from recorded ECGs; this method was recently discovered by the author and all the cancers and its related biochemical parameters can be estimated using rapidly changing QRS Complex as well as slowly changing, rising part of T-wave of ECGs. Using these three methods, almost any cancer can be screened rapidly and diagnosed in short time, non-invasively without biopsy or blood test or imaging devices. Our research indicated that human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) infection was found in almost every cancer we examined. In the presence of the strong infection of HPV-16, high incidence of cancer was found and when one person in family has cancer with increased HPV-16 virus infection, almost every member of the family was often infected with same degree of the infection. HPV-16 can be transmitted very easily by talking with the infected person in short distance. As a result, our latest cancer treatment now includes safe, rapid elimination of HPV-16 virus. We tested many potential cancer treatments and also evaluated potential role of optimal dose of vitamin D3, taurine, and PQQ as well as DHEA and for safe, effective, individualized treatment of cancer patients. As a consequence, we found optimal dose of vitamin D3 to be most effective, safe, and economical treatment due to its unique seven beneficial effects, including its anti-cancer effect and efficient urinary excretion of microorganisms. Abnormal increase of 8-OH-dG, which is proportional to DNA mutation and its relationship with cancer metastasis and aggressiveness of cancer and factors inhibiting Vitamin D3 effects will also be discussed. 

Biomarkers 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Diana Anderson photo
Biography:

Diana Anderson holds the Established Chair in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Bradford. She has 450+ peer-reviewed papers, nine books, has successfully supervised 29 PhDs, and has been a Member of Editorial Boards of 10 international journals. She has been or is Editor in Chief of a book series on toxicology for J Wiley and Sons and the Royal Society of Chemistry respectively. She gives key note addresses at various international meetings. She is a Consultant for many international organisations, such as the WHO, NATO, TWAS, UNIDO and the OECD. Her h index =54.

Abstract:

Detection tests have been developed for many cancers, but there is no single test to identify cancer in general. We have developed such an assay. In this modified patented Comet assay, we investigated peripheral lymphocytes of 208 individuals: 20 melanoma, 34 colon cancer, four lung cancer patients, 18 suspect melanoma, 28 polyposis, 10 COPD patients and 94 healthy volunteers. The natural logarithm of the Olive tail moment was plotted for exposure to UVA through different agar depths for each of the above groups and analysed using a repeated measures regression model. Response patterns for cancer patients formed a plateau after treating with UVA where intensity varied with different agar depths. In comparison, response patterns for healthy individuals returned towards control values and for pre/suspected cancers were intermediate with less of a plateau. All cancers tested, exhibited comparable responses. Analyses of receiver operating characteristic curves, of mean log Olive tail moments, for all cancers plus pre/suspected-cancer versus controls gave a value for the area under the curve of 0.87; for cancer versus pre/suspected-cancer plus controls the value was 0.89; and for cancer alone versus controls alone (excluding pre/suspected-cancer), the value was 0.93. By varying the threshold for test positivity, its sensitivity or specificity can approach 100% whilst maintaining acceptable complementary measures. Evidence presented indicates that this modified assay shows promise as both a stand-alone test and as a possible adjunct to other investigative procedures, as part of detection programmes for a range of cancers.

Keynote Forum

Srinivas Pentyala

Stony Brook Medical Center, USA

Keynote: Translational approach to detect biomarkers bedside
Biomarkers 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Srinivas Pentyala photo
Biography:

Srinivas Pentyala is working as the Director of Translational Research and also as Associate Professor of Anesthesiology at Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY, USA. He has joint appointments in the Departments of Urology, Health Sciences, Physiology and Biophysics at SBUMC. He has 80 publications and several patents to his credit. He has received several honors and awards not only for his role as a Researcher but also as an Educator. He is the Founding Director of several biotech and health care companies. He serves on the Advisory Board of several national and international biotech and health care companies, and research institutes. 

Abstract:

Biomarkers are important tools for disease detection and monitoring. A highly effective, clinically useful biomarker for a specific disease should be measurable in a readily accessible body fluid, such as serum, urine or saliva. Translational approach based applications are now being widely utilized in the field of point-of-care diagnostics.  The search for biomarkers in early disease detection has included proteins, metabolites and other biological molecules that are altered and secreted as a consequence of the disease process and are shed into body fluids. After collecting these body fluids, the next step was to isolate and identify the marker that would give an indication of the disease process. Unfortunately, this approach is laborious and time-consuming, as specific candidate biomarker (s) must be identified from among the thousands of intact and altered molecules in the collected body fluids. In many disease manifestations, a marker can occur in trace amounts, yet large volumes of fluids are collected. Dipsticks and lateral flow devices that are availabale at present are limited for their ability to detect markers beyond a specific concentration and also the collection and application of sample to these existing diagnostic strips and devices have many limitations. We identified unique biomarkers for cerebrospinal fluid leaks, prostate cancer, diabetic nephropathy and other diseases and symptoms. We also designed and tested several point-of-care diagnostic detection methods and devices that can detect trace biomarkers in large volumes of samples. The translational approach to identify biomarkers and develop point-of care diagnostic methods and devices will be presented. 

Keynote Forum

Jianhua Luo

University of Pittsburgh, USA

Keynote: Cancer genomic biomarkers in human malignancies
Biomarkers 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jianhua Luo photo
Biography:

Jianhua Luo has been studying molecular mechanism related to human malignancies in the last 24 years. Currently, he is a Professor of Pathology and Director of High Throughput Genome Center at University of Pittsburgh. In the last 16 years, he has been largely focusing on genetic and molecular mechanism of human prostate cancer and hepatocellular carcinomas. In this period, his group has identified and characterized several genes that are related to prostate cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, including SAPC, myopodin, CSR1, GPx3, ITGA7, MCM7, MT1h and GPC3. He proposed prostate cancer field effect in 2002. He is one of the pioneers in utilizing high throughput gene expression and genome analyses to analyze field effects in prostate cancer and liver cancer. He is also the first in using methylation array and whole genome methylation sequencing to analyze prostate cancer. Recently, his group found that patterns of copy number variants of certain specific genome loci are predictive of prostate cancer clinical outcomes, regardless tissue origin. His discovery of several novel fusion transcripts and their association with aggressive prostate cancer has brought significant new insight into the field of prostate cancer research.

 

Abstract:

Cancer remains one of the most lethal diseases for human. In recent studies, genomic analysis has rapidly advanced the diagnostics of human cancers. Our result showed that combination of genome copy number variance, genome methylation pattern and novel fusion transcripts specific for cancer achieved high accuracy in predicting clinical outcomes of human cancers. Interestingly, some of these fusion genes are also present in a variety of human malignancies. Some of these fusion gene products trigger new pathways that are essential for carcinogenesis in multiple human cancers, and create novel functions that are not present in wild type gene counterparts. Some of these novel fusion genes are highly targetable. Treatment of cancers with drugs specific for these genes and their signaling pathways produced dramatic improvement of metastasis and survival rate of animals xenografted with cancers positive for these fusion genes. Our analyses suggest that targeting therapy for fusion genes holds promise as an effective treatment for human cancers. 

Biomarkers 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michael Retsky photo
Biography:

Michael Retsky has done his PhD in Physics from the University of Chicago. He has made a career change to cancer research 30 years ago. He is on the Staff at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health and Faculty at University College London. He was on Judah Folkman’s Staff at Harvard Medical School for 12 years. He is Editor of a Nature/Springer book on the breast cancer project to be published in 2017. He was the first person to use what is now called metronomic adjuvant chemotherapy and is a Founder and on the Board of Directors of the Colon Cancer Alliance. He has published more than 60 papers in physics and cancer.

Abstract:

A bimodal pattern of hazard of relapse among early stage breast cancer patients has been identified in multiple databases from US, Europe and Asia. We are studying these data to determine if this can lead to new ideas on how to prevent relapse in breast cancer. Using computer simulation and access to a very high quality database from Milan for patients treated with mastectomy only, we proposed that relapses within 3 years of surgery are stimulated somehow by the surgical procedure. Most relapses in breast cancer are in this early category. Retrospective data from a Brussels anesthesiology group suggests a plausible mechanism. Use of ketorolac, a common NSAID analgesic used in surgery was associated with far superior disease-free survival in the first five years after surgery. The expected prominent early relapse events in months 9-18 are reduced 5-fold. Transient systemic inflammation accompanying surgery (identified by IL-6 in serum) could facilitate angiogenesis of dormant micrometastases, proliferation of dormant single cells, and seeding of circulating cancer stem cells (perhaps in part released from bone marrow) resulting in early relapse and could have been effectively blocked by the perioperative anti-inflammatory agent. If this observation holds up to further scrutiny, it could mean that the simple use of this safe, inexpensive and effective anti-inflammatory agent at surgery might eliminate early relapses. We suggest this would be most effective for triple negative breast cancer and be especially valuable in low and middle income countries. Similar bimodal patterns have been identified in other cancers suggesting a general effect.